Best Websites for Free Lego Building Instructions

LEGO is one of those time-worn products that never seems to get old, and part of that survival factor – okay, MUCH of it – stems from the ability to take pre-designed builds and change them into something else completely. Sure, having a pirate ship is pretty cool, but what about a pirate ship with rocket engines? Or buildings on top? Or even a volcano? Sweet.

Unfortunately, LEGO constructs of high quality can prove quite complex, and those lacking an engineer’s brain – which would be most of us – might not be able to create much more on our own than amorphous blobs that kinda look like what’s in our imagination. Fear not, would be designers: there are quite a few websites online that offer free instructions for building new, grand LEGO constructs. Have a look, and see what you can make out of what you have.

LEGO Factory: Sure, this doesn’t quite follow the criteria of free building instructions, but LEGO Factory is too cool not to mention. Created by LEGO itself, this free program allows you to design your own creations via a program, then order the bricks needed to put it together. And if you don’t need the bricks? Just design the sucker and put it together yourself.

Free LEGO Instructions: The name doesn’t get much more self-explanatory, does it? Free LEGO Instructions provides exactly what it says, a massive directory of official LEGO product instructions. They’re all viewable straight from the website, making this place perfect for anybody who bought a LEGO product but lost the manual. It also has a large repository of kid creations where tykes can submit their stuff to show the world.

LEGO Instructions: Basically the same deal as Free LEGO Instructions, only this place allows you to download the instructions in .pdf form rather than viewing them strictly online. Not bad at all.

Lions Gate Models: A nice website featuring a fair array of custom LEGO builds along with instructions to put the things together. Decent on the free side, though if you’re willing to pony up a bit of dough the website offers custom instructions for some rather massive models, including whole buildings. Not bad, if you have way too many bricks on your hands.

Cubiculus: A solid database of user-submitted, custom LEGO sets ranging from the tiny (tiny, simple tractors) to the absurd (incredibly-complex Sherman tank builds). An excellent range of instructions overall, though the site itself seems a bit glitchy and slow at times.

That not enough? Then it’s time to dig into online blogs, as there are a lot of die-hard LEGO lovers out there who create custom wonders all the time – and often provide the instructions, free of charge. Make sure to check the links of other, similar bogs as well, as all of these constructive artists form a strong community.