How to Dry Flowers without Spending Money and using Electricity

Dried flowers can brighten up a home or give it a country cottage look inside. It looks striking hung up or made into beautiful bouquets or wreathes throughout your house. Dried flowers replace the fresh summer flowers that you cannot get in the colder months.

When I dry flowers, I go out in the morning just after the morning dew has dried up and cut particular blooms that I know will dry well. Since I live in the country, I often go out for walks and pick weed flowers, wild flowers, annuals and perennials. I also pick grasses that have headed out, they make a nice addition to some of the dried flower arrangements I make. The dried grasses look great grouped together filling my tall medium sized crock on the hearth.

To dry a bunch of flowers I tie the stems together with a piece of twine or loop a rubber band around them tightly. Then I hang them upside down from hooks that are around the edges of the fireplace. I have several bunches drying at once. Since I usually leave them hanging up for a long period of time, I don’t check them for dryness. But after a few weeks they will be dry enough to make flower arrangements or add to wreathes. It is important that you hang the flowers upside down in a dry ventilated area out of the sun and elements.

I have several dried flowers that are three years old that still have retained their shape and color. But I have to replace most of them yearly or at least every other year. I never spray them , although you can use hairspray or silicon spray to help preserve them. I don’t like to add pollutants in the air.

Another method I have used is to press flowers under books. Because I usually press several all at once, I find it easier to use newspaper or thin acid free computer paper and large books. A flower press is too small for how many I dry at once. I carefully arrange several blooms on the paper and place another sheet on top. Then I place a book on top of the paper and then add another layer of paper and blooms on top if it. If the book is big enough, I will add a layer in the middle of the book. I make a pile of books with the drying flower layered in between them. Lots of layers, lots of pressed dried flowers. I make bookmarks and decorate paper items with them.

I have used silicon crystals to dry my roses and other delicate flowers. Place your blossom on a plate that has an inch of silicon on it and carefully spoon the crystals on and around the petals of the flower. Leave it in a dry area out of the sunlight for several days. Check after three days to see if it is dry. This method works well enough.

Microwaving a blossom will cause it to shrink and shrivel drastically, but it retains the color well. Place some blooms or large petals in between a damp paper towel. Microwave until it is dry. Check the progress every 30 seconds. This is good for bigger petals used for potpourri and for anything you want to add color to.

I prefer the tried and true old methods of drying upside down and pressing. I get my best results with them at little to no expense. These two methods do not pollute the air or use electricity so they appeal to me in that respect too. Next time you are walking around, look for pretty weeds and grasses and try drying them. They make nice additions to your decor.