Super Smash Bros N64 Review

The original Super Smash Bros. for the N64 was made back in 1999 and it was a fighting game comprised of the more popular Nintendo game characters. Ranging from Mario and Luigi to Pikachu and Jigglypuff, this game contained 12 different fighters each with their own unique combat capabilities. Because of its original fighting mechanism where players were defeated by being knocked off the screen, many reviewers and gamers found Super Smash Bros. highly entertaining. This resulted in the game receiving relatively high scores in its multiplayer gameplay where IGN called it “the game’s main selling point.” Overall the mix of side-to-side multiplayer, unique battle stages, and quality music, Super Smash Bros. was able to reach the top of the video game food chain.

Multiplayer and Single Player Gameplay

The game is well known for its incredible multiplayer gaming. Here up to four players playing on the same N64 could duke it out against each other. Each time a player got hit by another’s attack, his percentage bar would go up. This percentage bar was unlike anything that had been seen in the past. Instead of trying to reduce an opponent’s health to zero, players tried to knock each other’s percentage up. This was so because the higher a player’s heath percentage, the farther he/she would be knocked away after being hit. This clever piece of ingenuity was a great and original piece that gave Super Smash Bros. its edge over other fighting games that were all similar with their health bars.

Also, the stages that were available for usage were each unique in its own way. The nine stages that were allowed to be played on had different platforms that allowed players to jump on and each contained its own little extra bit that made that stage special. For instance, Saffron City (from the Pokemon series) sent out Pokemon every now and then to attack players while Sector Z (from Star Fox) had a fighter pilot come out every now and then to shoot laser beams at the players. As can be seen, the special bits from each stage allowed for 9 different great battle settings.

Not only were the stages unique and creative in their own way, the playable fighters were also fun and exciting to use each in their own way. Examples of these would be Link’s sword and boomerang, Samus’s blaster and ball form, and even Donkey Kong’s heavy smashing abilities. Every character had their own fun and unique traits that made every battle an entirely new game.

Unfortunately all good things must come to an end. As IGN had said that the multiplayer was the game’s selling point, the single player mode was the exact opposite. There were only four available activities in the singe player section (although CPUs could be set in the multiplayer section) and they were the campaigns, training mode, bonus 1 practice, and bonus 2 practice. The training mode is pretty much what multiplayer with a single CPU would have been except for the fact that items could be dropped out of the sky at will. The bonus practices were amusing for a while as each character had their own bonus practices. The first one was called “Break the Targets” where the player would run around a set course trying to destroy ten different bullseye targets with any attack. The second was called “Board the Platforms”, where the player would run around a different set course trying to land on ten differently sized platforms around the map.

Now finally, the campaign mode must be rated. Right away the player is prompted to pick a character, a difficulty, and a number of stocks or lives. Then a series of ten standard battles mixed in with three mini games (two of which are the bonus practices) and a final boss are played through. The campaigns become repetitive by the third play through due to the fact that the battles never change no matter which character is chosen to challenge the campaigns. Really the only reason to bother with a second play through of the campaigns is to unlock the several secret characters that are available. All in all the single player mode is unlike the multiplayer mode in the fact that it is not amusing and does not influence players to defeat it multiple times. The multiplayer mode on the other hand is addicting and entertaining even when playing against several CPUs because of its available different settings and characters.

Super Smash Bros. is a delightful game made by Hal Laboratory in association with Nintendo and was a great success in the gaming industry. Its creative ingenuity prompts me to give this title a 9/10 because of its flawless multiplayer yet flawed single player.